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How to use the EMF Circuit Board Module By Ghost Gear

The EMF Circuit Board Module by Ghost Gear is a one-of-a-kind device. It is the only EMF detection reference module made for ghost hunting. There are other EMF reference modules, but they are made for industrial applications and require 50 milligauss (mG) or higher to activate. Our EMF reference module will activate as low as 3 milligauss (mG). The sensitivity can be adjusted by using the potentiometer. What makes it a reference module is that it has I/O. The I/O stands for Inputs and Outputs.


Unlike other EMF boards, ours allows you to add external components like a LED or an Arduino or Raspberry Pi to the digital output. It also has an analog output allowing you to capture the frequency and amplitude of the EMF detected. It was designed such that a very tech savoy person could use it for advanced projects and a not-so tech savoy person could use it for simple projects. If that were not enough, we also added a jumper so you can pick the level of EMF to activate the digital output and internal buzzer. While we were at it, we also added a sensitivity potentiometer so you can fine-tune your boards EMF sensitivity.


For the tutorials you will need the following:

· EMF Reference Module by Ghost Gear

· 350 Ohm Resistor

· 133 Ohm Resistor

· Active Piezo Buzzer

· Red LED

· Soldering Iron and Solder

· 9 Volt Battery


The EMF module runs on 5V to 9V. A rule of thumb for voltage is that you will need to supply 2V for each external LED you use. If you use 3 external LED’s, then the minimum input voltage would be 6V.

A 6V battery holder with switch can be found HERE.




Let’s go through an example of adding an LED to the digital output.

Our input voltage will be 9V. We will be using a single red LED that, according to the datasheet, operates at 2V and uses 20mA (0.02Amps). We cannot supply 9V to the LED or we will damage it so we must drop the voltage down to 2V.

Using Ohms Law, we get:

R = Volts/Amps

In our case Volts will be the difference between our input voltage and the forward voltage (LED).

Volts = 9V – 2V = 7V

So, armed with this information;

R = 7V/.02 or R = 350 ohms

So, we will need to use a 350 Ohm resistor in line with the LED.

Now, let’s go through an example of adding a buzzer to the digital output.

Our input voltage will be 9V. We will be using an active buzzer that, according to the datasheet, operates at 5V and uses 30mA (0.03Amps). We cannot supply 9V to the buzzer or we will damage it so we must drop the voltage down to 5V.

Using Ohms Law, we get:

R = Volts/Amps

In our case Volts will be the difference between our input voltage and the forward voltage (buzzer).

Volts = 9V – 5V = 4V

So, armed with this information;

R = 4V/.03 or R = 133 ohms

So, we will need to use a 133 Ohm resistor in line with the active buzzer.


Notice I said we need an active buzzer. Active buzzers are needed for DC circuits. Passive buzzers are for use on AC circuits. You could use a passive buzzer on the analog output, but not the digital output.


We have shown you how to put together an external LED and an external buzzer. You will need to use Ohm’s Law to determine the resistance needed. You could do so much more with the EMF module such as connect the analog to an oscilloscope to identify the EMF frequency captured or connect a passive buzzer and amp to the analog output to “listen” to the EMF. The possibilities are almost endless as to what you could use this EMF reference module for.


Also, there are online LED resistor calculators you can use. Just search for “LED resistor calculator”.


Learn More about LED datasheets HERE

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